Skip to content

When will I get my 2022 tax refund?

With another COVID-19 variant surging, Americans may see more delays during the next tax season.

Many people were awaiting the return to normalcy following the spread of Delta, and just in general since the start of the pandemic.

Now, with Omicron spreading, that seems much less likely to happen.

Many people were hoping to have a normal tax year with normal deadlines.

Related: Between $1,502 and $5,980 in stimulus payments to go out in 2022, here’s how to qualify


While that may not happen entirely, it should not be as messy as last year.

Many are wondering when it is they’ll receive their refund, something that usually only takes around two weeks.

Last year people waited months for their refunds, and some are still waiting.

Here is what 2022 tax season could look like

The process for filing taxes for the year 2021 in 2020 may end up being more complicated due to paperwork.

Related: Child tax credit payments have ended, but stimulus checks will continue being sent into 2022

[connatix-video-ad]

In 2021 families received stimulus checks and advanced payments on their child tax credits.

This all needs to be accounted for.

Tax returns should be ready by Friday, April 15 in anticipation of that being the deadline.

The estimated time it takes to receive a refund could be up to three weeks.

Related: Saver’s credit could give you a $2,000 free tax break in 2022


Before the pandemic, returns were accepted as early as the last week of April, but new laws may be passed to change that.

It may delay the time the IRS will start accepting refunds by one or two weeks.

If that’s the case, refunds won’t start showing up for people until the end of February or beginning of March.

The extensions given since the start of the pandemic are unlikely to carry over into 2022.

Related: Millions will see surprise $125 stimulus refund for the first time in almost ten years, is one yours?


When you get your refund also depends on other factors, like how early you file (the earlier the better), and which credits you plan to claim.

The earned income tax credit and child tax credit can make refunds take longer while the IRS verifies the validity of these claims.

Filing electronically instead of by mail will ensure a quicker refund.

If you have debts owed to the federal government, you may not see a refund.



Categories: News

Top