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How are filing taxes and tax brackets changing for married couples in 2022?

Marital status for tax reasons is important. It determines someone’s filing status at the end of the year. Information is available to help couples prepare.

The IRS shared new inflation adjustments, which will be used in 2023 when people file their taxes for 2022.

There will still be seven tax brackets. Income limits were increased to make up for the high rate of inflation over the last year.

Related: How 2022 federal income rates work

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There will be tax breaks for couples filing jointly, but it’s suggested to check and see the differences between filing jointly or married filing separately. This can help determine which way is the best for you to file.

There are tax breaks available to married couples they otherwise couldn’t use if filing separate according to AS.com.

What tax breaks are there for married couples?

The Earned Income Tax Credit is for families and workers that have low to moderate income.

The Child and Dependent Care Credit is for caregivers that take care of children under 13 or disable dependents.

The American Opportunity Tax Credit and Lifetime Learning Credit helps reduce taxes for those in college or paying for college for a spouse or child.

Related: Tax brackets are being raised thanks to the impact of inflation across the nation


There are credits for legally adopting a child who is not already your spouse’s.

There may be a smaller IRA contribution deduction.

Sometimes it’s better to file separately, especially if a spouse is protecting themselves from a tax liability their spouse has. This is true in cases of suspected tax evasion.

The new tax brackets are as follows:

Single or married filing separately

  • 37% for incomes over $539,900
  • 35% for incomes over $215,950
  • 32% for incomes over $170,050
  • 24% for incomes over $89,075
  • 22% for incomes over $41,775
  • 12% for incomes over $10,275
  • 10% incomes of $10,275 or less

Married filing jointly

  • 37% for incomes over $647,850
  • 35% for incomes over $431,900
  • 32% for incomes over $340,100
  • 24% for incomes over $178,150
  • 22% for incomes over $83,550
  • 12% for incomes over $20,550
  • 10% for incomes of $20,550 or less

Standard deductions have also increased for 2022:

Single and married filing separately, $12,950

Related: Will parents need to pay back the monthly Child Tax Credit on their taxes in 2022?

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Married filing jointly, $25,900

The reason for increasing income limits but keeping the same brackets is to stop people from being bumped into a higher tax bracket as the economy grapples with inflation.



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