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SSDI: 3 ways to boost your benefits and not lose $1,000s

Everyone who collects benefits from the Social Security Administration, including SSDI, has specific circumstances in their own life that determine your benefit amount.

SSDI paperwork

Everyone’s benefits across the board when it comes to Social Security programs see a boost when the COLA increases.

This is to help protect those on a fixed income from inflation.

The 5.9% for 2022 is the highest boost in recent history, but the reason is because the rate of inflation was so high in 2021.

There are some ways you could see your own benefits increase in unexpected ways.


COLA: Will there be another raise in 2023?

Here are 3 ways your SSDI could see a major boost

Your spouses dies

If a spouse passes away, when it happens the widow of the spouse collecting benefits could see a $255 lump sum payment.

If your Social Security benefits were less than your living spouse’s, you could see an increase in what you got each month.

This is thanks to Survivor Benefits, which can be claimed by the living spouse if they’re over age 60.

Depending on your age, your benefits could be 71.5% to 100% of your spouse’s.

The younger you are, the lower they’ll be.


Social Security & SSDI: Can I claim both benefits?

Children or dependent minors can claim SSDI based on a parent’s benefit

If a parent of a disabled child or minor passes away, the child could get survivor benefits.

The child needs to be unmarried and under age 18.

They could qualify at 19 if they’re still in high school full time.

The eligible children could see as much as 75% of their dead parent’s benefits.


Your disability that got you SSDI becomes worse, impacting your income

If you have a disability impacting your ability to make an income, you may be able to get SSI and SSDI.

There are different requirements for both with earnings limits and what you can own in assets.

As for SSDI, the amount you get is based on many factors.


SSDI and SSI at the same time, is it possible?

This includes the age you became disabled, your work history, and how long you’re eligible.

If you’re forced to work less due to your disability worsening, you could see a boost in your benefits.

If you get better and can work more, your disability could end because you’re no longer considered disabled.

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