Skip to content
Home » Valentine's Day » Despite historic declines in teen pregnancy and birth rates, there is still more work to be done

Despite historic declines in teen pregnancy and birth rates, there is still more work to be done

National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month (NTPPM)—hosted annually in May by the Office of Population Affairs (OPA)—celebrates the historic decline in rates of teen pregnancy and births in the United States, while highlighting the work that still needs to be done to help adolescents reach their full potential. Despite the progress we’ve made, we continue to see disparities by race, ethnicity, and in the most vulnerable populations—including youth who are homeless, living in foster care, or involved with the juvenile justice system—compared to the general population.

NTPPM is about more than preventing teen pregnancy. It is about connecting youth to services and opportunities and ensuring positive outcomes for adolescents. When we work to prevent teen pregnancy, we help youth achieve their full potential.

DiSanto Propane (Billboard)

The Center for Sexual Health and Wellness and the Coalition on Sexual Health joins organizations across the country in participating in National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month. While May is a critical time to consider teen pregnancy and how it impacts individuals and the community, it is important to note that this issue is one to focus on year-round.

The Center for Sexual Health and Wellness offer confidential, low or no cost reproductive health services for teens and adults. The Center also provides education in schools and in the community regarding teen pregnancy prevention issues. The Coalition on Sexual Health works with the community to decrease teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, and enhances youth development and empowerment.


For more information on Center for Sexual Health and Wellness services or the Coalition on Sexual Health, please contact the Livingston County Department of Health at 243-7299 or visit here.



Top