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Around 9% of towns, villages have opted out of recreational marijuana law in New York

New data provided by the Associations of Towns of New York State indicates that around 9% of communities have opted out of the zoning portion of recreational marijuana legalization.

What does that mean? For towns that opted out, businesses will not be able to open if they sell or allow patrons to consume marijuana in those communities.

How many towns is that? Across the state there are 84 of them that have opted out of both retail sale of marijuana and on-site consumption of cannabis.


The same can be said for villages. Around 9%, or 46 villages in New York have opted out of the law, which would not only allow the share in modern law, but revenues that will come from its legalization across New York.

In a matter of years it’s expected to be a massive tax revenue generator.

There’s still time for towns and villages opt out. “At this point, it appears there is not a major wave of opt-outs sweeping across the state,” Chris Anderson, research director for the Association of Towns recently said. “We expect to see some more activity, but it’s certainly pretty late in the game. We have a good indication now it will be a low opt-out percentage statewide.”

As many have learned in the Finger Lakes region over the last two months, there will be exceptions to all the state’s rules. For example, the Cayuga Nation, who has sovereign authority and can bypass state regulations – began selling marijuana without state license and before respective communities around them fully-committed to being pro- or anti-cannabis.

 



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