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Lawmakers push to end legacy admissions at colleges in New York

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A new bill, the Fair College Admissions Act, has been introduced to end legacy admissions at both public and private colleges in New York. This practice gives special consideration to children of alumni, which some lawmakers argue is discriminatory and unfair.


Sen. Andrew Gounardes (D-26th Senate District) emphasized the urgency following the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling last year that ended race-conscious admissions programs. “New York, the state with the most number of legacy admitting institutions, must take bold action to dismantle the systems that perpetuate inequality and racial injustice,” Gounardes said.

If passed, colleges violating this law would be penalized 10 percent of their tuition revenue, redirected to the state’s tuition assistance program. High school sophomore Hana Ira, among students advocating in Albany, argued that legacy admissions promote inequality, highlighting her parents’ sacrifices as immigrants. The bill is currently in the higher education committees and must reach the floor for a vote before the session ends.