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Nearly 400,000 dropped from Medicaid due to paperwork issues, not eligibility requirements

In a significant development affecting New York’s public health insurance system, nearly 400,000 residents have been removed from Medicaid due to issues related to re-enrollment paperwork.

This follows the end of the pandemic-related suspension of Medicaid eligibility checks.

Since July, about 30 percent of those due for renewal, totaling nearly 800,000 New Yorkers, have been unenrolled from Medicaid plans, with roughly half of these disenrollments occurring due to paperwork rather than eligibility based on income.


Out of the 1.7 million enrollees who renewed their coverage since July, 784,798 have been disenrolled, according to data from health policy nonprofit KFF.

The disenrollment process is expected to last 14 months, is part of a nationwide challenge. During the COVID-19 pandemic, states paused Medicaid eligibility checks as enrollment surged to record levels, significantly reducing uninsured rates.

Child welfare advocates have urged Governor Kathy Hochul to eliminate the annual re-enrollment requirement for children under age 6, citing successful continuous coverage policies in states like Oregon and Washington.

The New York State Department of Health has implemented measures to facilitate the transition, including federal waivers and establishing a call center to assist with renewals, in efforts to address these challenges and mitigate the impact on vulnerable populations.