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Popular Harriet Tubman Park Ranger announces retirement

The first person hired when the Harriet Tubman National Historical Park in Auburn was established has announced her retirement.


Ranger Kim helped guide Tubman Park to success

It was announced at Thursday’s City Council meeting that Ranger Kim Szewczyk will step down later this year. Auburn City Clerk Chuck Mason says she’s done a lot for the park and for the Auburn community.

Szewczyk began her Park Service career as a seasonal park ranger at Lowell National Historical Park in Massachusetts. She was the chief of interpretation and education at the Women’s Rights National Historical Park in Seneca Falls when she was hired following the establishment of the Tubman Park in 2016.

The council issued a proclamation for International Underground Railroad Month in September and presented a key to the city to Pastor Ted Freeman, Junior, a descendant of Underground Railroad pioneers, Kate and Harry Freeman, founders of the New Guinea Negro Settlement in Auburn. Szewczyk also received a key to the city from Mayor Mike Quill.

Listen to my full Inside the FLX conversation with Auburn City Clerk Chuck Mason below.


Related: Congress OKs Tubman coins; will help fund Tubman Home



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